Upcoming Events

National Volunteer Week

National Volunteer Week (NVW) is a time to celebrate and thank Canada’s 12.7 million volunteers. 

This year's theme is: “It's time to applaud this country's volunteers." 

From coast to coast to coast, Canada’s volunteers work tirelessly to spur progress in their community, city and country. They give their time in support of causes and programs they believe in and ask for nothing in return. 

And for that, we owe them our thanks. Let's roll out the red carpet and cheer them on.

It is our honour to call on our partners and friends to help make this National Volunteer Week extraordinary. Let’s join together and ensure the 12.7 million Canadian volunteers we count on receive a well-deserved round of applause!

Check out the NVW 2020 Campaign Kit, full of tips, templates and planning tools to help you plan your NVW events.

This National Volunteer Week, thank a volunteer for all they do. #NVW2020


Additional Information

Earth Day

Earth Day is April 22 of every year. April 22, 2020 will mark 50 years of Earth Day.

The theme for Earth Day 2020 is climate action. The enormous challenge — but also the vast opportunities — of action on climate change have distinguished the issue as the most pressing topic for the 50th anniversary.

Climate change represents the biggest challenge to the future of humanity and the life-support systems that make our world habitable.


Additional Information

National Day of Mourning

Held annually in Canada on April 28, the National Day of Mourning is dedicated to remembering those who have lost their lives, or suffered injury or illness on the job or due to a work-related tragedy.

The National Day of Mourning is not only a day to remember and honour those lives lost or injured due to a workplace tragedy, but also a day to collectively renew our commitment to improve health and safety in the workplace and prevent further injuries, illnesses and deaths.

On April 28th the Canadian flag will fly at half-mast on Parliament Hill and on all federal government buildings. Employers and workers will observe Day of Mourning in a variety of ways. Some light candles, lay wreaths, wear commemorative pins, ribbons or black armbands, and pause for a moment of silence at 11:00 a.m.


Additional Information

Workers' Day (International Labour Day)

Recognized on the first day of May every year, International Workers’ Day, or May Day, commemorates the struggles of workers around the world through the labour movements and the political left. Although established in Canada since the beginning of the 20th century, this day is not deemed a statutory holiday, as opposed to Labour Day, celebrated on the first Monday in September.

PEA Education Conference

The PEA's Education Conference will be held May 1 and 2, 2020 at the Laurel Point Inn in Victoria. The theme of the conference is Evolving Human Rights in the Professional Workplace. 

Find out more.


Additional Information

International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia

May 17th is a symbolic date for homosexual people. The World Health Organization (WHO) removed homosexuality from the list of mental disorders on May 17, 1990. In 2003, Fondation Émergence created the first national day against homophobia, which expanded to the international level in 2006. Finally, in 2014, Fondation Émergence added “transphobia” to the name of the day. Every year, the campaigns organized for this day help fight discrimination in our society.

May 17th is the perfect time to : 

  • ​Hang posters to raise awareness of LGBT issues and prevent homophobia and transphobia
  • Put "ALLY" stickers on the door of your office, on your bag, etc.
  • Make a personal commitment to be a better ally for the coming year 


Additional Information

National Indigenous Peoples Day

June 21 is National Indigenous Peoples Day. This is a day for all Canadians to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. The Canadian Constitution recognizes these three groups as Aboriginal peoples, also known as Indigenous peoples.

Although these groups share many similarities, they each have their own distinct heritage, language, cultural practices and spiritual beliefs.

In cooperation with Indigenous organizations, the Government of Canada chose June 21, the summer solstice, for National Aboriginal Day, now known as National Indigenous Peoples Day. For generations, many Indigenous peoples and communities have celebrated their culture and heritage on or near this day due to the significance of the summer solstice as the longest day of the year.


Additional Information

Recovery Day

What is Recovery Day all about? On September 8, 2020, people in recovery from addiction and mental health issues will join friends and family to build awareness, challenge societal stigma, and celebrate the role that recovery plays in improving life for individuals, families, and communities. Though Recovery Day events are now held all across the country, the first Recovery Day in Canada took place in Vancouver. Realizing that the US recognizes the month of September as “Recovery Month” and that Canada had no equivalent at that time, it was time to bring the recovery movement to Canada!

 


Additional Information

Orange Shirt Day

Orange Shirt Day is a legacy of the St. Joseph Mission (SJM) Residential School (1891-1981) Commemoration Project and Reunion events that took place in Williams Lake, BC, Canada, in May 2013. This project was the vision of Esketemc (Alkali Lake) Chief Fred Robbins, who is a former student himself.  It brought together former students and their families from the Secwepemc, Tsilhqot’in, Southern Dakelh and St’at’imc  Nations along with the Cariboo Regional District, the Mayors and municipalities, School Districts and civic organizations in the Cariboo Region. 

The annual Orange Shirt Day on September 30th opens the door to global conversation on all aspects of Residential Schools. It is an opportunity to create meaningful discussion about the effects of Residential Schools and the legacy they have left behind.  A discussion all Canadians can tune into and create bridges with each other for reconciliation.  A day for survivors to be reaffirmed that they matter, and so do those that have been affected.  Every Child Matters, even if they are an adult, from now on. 


Additional Information

The Red Dress Campaign

Jaime Black, a Métis artist, launched The REDress Project in 2014. The installation art project involved collecting and hanging 600 red dresses symbolizing the hundreds of Indigenous women and girls whose lives were stolen.

Indigenous women and girls in Canada are disproportionately affected by violence and are over-represented in the rate of women that are murdered and go missing. The rate of homicide of Indigenous women is five times higher than non-Indigenous women.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) began drawing attention to the issue of violence against Indigenous women in 2005. They assembled a database on 582 missing and murdered women and girls.

In 2015, the RCMP reported that 1,815 Indigenous women were murdered between 1980 and 2014.

In response to numerous calls for action from organizations such as NWAC and the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA), the Government of Canada launched an entirely independent National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) in September 2016.

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In this section

The PEA was formed in 1974, by a group of professionals working in the public sector. The story goes that the founders of the union mortgaged their houses to fund negotiations of the union’s first collective agreement. 

Now, the PEA is BC’s union for professionals. We represent a wide range of professionals including lawyers, foresters, engineers, agrologists, teachers, veterinarians, fundraisers, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists program managers, librarians and more.

Our union is led by the PEA Executive. They represent members from across the chapters of the PEA and set the overall vision and direction for our union.

Resources for our members

Navigating a union can sometime be a challenging process. Under this section of the website you will find resources to help you navigate the PEA. In the members section you'll find expense claim reimbursements, information on the PEA's scholarship and bursary program and our grants and donations program.

Collective bargaining and job action resources explain the process of collective bargaining and what to do in the unlikely event of job action. 

Local reps can also find resources to help them complete their job more effectively. This includes ways to welcome new members, how to take notes in investigation disciplinary meetings and more.

The heart of our union

The PEA is made up of nine chapters, or groups of members who either work for the same employer or are in the same field of work. Each chapter has an elected executive tasked with running the affairs of the chapter. Each chapter is entitled to representation at the PEA Executive, the governing body of the union. 

Our members work for a range of employers: the Province of BC, the University of Victoria, St. Margaret's School, the Family Maintenance Enforcement Program, the Oil and Gas Commission, the Law Society of BC, Legal Services Society, the Okangan Regional Library and health authorities across BC.

Professionals need unions now more then ever

Since the 1970’s, when the PEA was formed, our mission has been to ensure our members can work in safe, productive environments and receive fair and reasonable wages and benefits for the valuable work they do. We help individuals and groups of professional workers to understand the challenges they face in their workplaces and some of the solutions available to them. 

We work with potential members to become certified as a union and achieve the wages, benefits and respect they deserve. 

The Professional | Volume 46 Issue 1

The Professional is the PEA's award-winning, quarterly magazine for members.

The January-February 2020 issue includes a Vancouver Sun op/ed piece from PEA Executive Director Scott McCannell on the Legal Services Society strike.

Read the January-February 2020 issue

 

 

The PEA was formed in 1974 to represent licensed professionals in the BC Public Service. Since then the organization has grown to include a wide range of professionals from across BC. Find our more about our governance, staff and strategic direction.

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